2016-11-24

Current Events: Do Something for the #NODAPL Water Protectors Today



Today is Thanksgiving Day a now traditional American Holiday, but this year I can't bear to even think about enjoying it when there are members of the Sioux Nation and other Native American Tribes as well as non-Native Americans peacefully protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline that have been suffering a brutal backlash from the Oil Police (as they are becoming known) without doing something.  Even if it just a token.  I wrote about this a little in the past.

Lets start with some history here is some of the background on the DAPL and the protest surrounding it.



Next is a video by The Young Turks that I think does a good job of explaining the un-ceded territory and the stakeholders involved.



I believe that while the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has not granted Energy Transfer Partners (the company building the Dakota Access Pipeline) easements necessary to drill under the Missouri River (Lake Oahe), that the money they will lose in delays is much more than the fines they will impose if they go ahead and proceed with they work without the appropriate permits.  The drone footage of the site (below) appears to support that belief.





When you add to it the fact that recently the Oil Police have escalated their resistance peaceful water protectors and the fact that corporate media is largely ignoring the violence; this places the responsibility on us to do something about it.








When you add to all thit the fact that initially the route was planned to run 10 miles morth of Bismarck but was moved because in the height of irony it was determined to be a threat to the city's water supply!

So I found a link that listed 8 ways to help the water protectors at the Standing Rock Reservation that spurred me to make some phone calls on behalf of the #NODAPL protesters, the only person I go to was a switchboard operator at the White House and a Voicemail box at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers so i did follow that up with sending emails to all of the same people, it was the least I could do today..


If you would like to do the same and I hope that you will.  Fere are the contact numbers and scripts I made up for myself.


Government Entities

White House (202) 456-1111 or (202) 456-1414 Contact Form

Hi there my name is _______________ I am a resident of ________________ and I am calling this Thanksgiving Day to ask that President Obama issue an executive order to stop all progress on the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline and end the atrocities being committed against the peaceful protesters at DAPL constructions sites.  Thank you for your time.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at (202) 761-0011 Contact Form

Hi there my name is _______________ I am a resident of ________________  and I am calling this Thanksgiving Day to ask that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers do not grant access or easements for the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline and prevent this pipeline from crossing the Missouri River (Lake Oahe), furthermore I would like to voice my belief that it is the intent of the pipeline constructors to proceed with drilling and construction of the crossing with or without permission and absorbing the costs of the fines incurred.  To what extent you can prevent this from happening I would like to request that you do so.  Thank you for your time.

North Dakota governor Jack Dalrymple at (701) 328-2200 Contact Form

Hi there my name is _______________ I am a resident of ________________  and I am calling this Thanksgiving Day to ask that the Gov. Jack Dalrymple issue an order to stop all progress on the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline and end the atrocities being committed against the peaceful protesters at DAPL constructions sites. Furthermore I would like to voice my belief that it is the intent of the pipeline constructors to proceed with drilling and construction of the Missouri River (Lake Oahe) crossing with or without permission and absorbing the costs of the fines incurred.  To what extent you can prevent this from happening I would like to request that you do so.


Energy Transfer Partners

Executive Vice President Lee Hanse (210) 403-6455 Email Executive Vice President Lee Hanse
Vice President Glenn Emery (210) 403-6762 Email Vice President Glenn Emery
Lead Analyst Michael (Cliff) Waters at (713) 989-2404 Email Lead Analyst Michael (Cliff) Waters


Hi there my name is _______________ I am a resident of ________________  and I am calling this Thanksgiving Day to ask that Energy Transfer Partners stop all progress on the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline and stop the atrocities being committed against the peaceful protesters being perpetrated in your name at DAPL constructions sites. Furthermore I would like to voice my belief that it is your intent to proceed with drilling and construction of the Missouri River (Lake Oahe) crossing with or without permission, absorbing the costs of the fines incurred.  While this may make fiscal sense to you as a corporate entity, as an American Citizen who the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers works at the behest of I would like to re-iterate that any such construction without proper legal permission will not be forgotten and the American Citizens will pressure our Government to prosecute your company to the fullest extent. 

I just want to leave yo with one last note even though we celebrate this day it is important to realize that to to the Native Americans the story does not end with "happily ever after."  Please read the story of this day from the their side and note that it is slightly different.


"Turner said what most people do not know about the first Thanksgiving is that the Wampanoag and Pilgrims did not sit down for a big turkey dinner and it was not an event that the Wampanoag knew about or were invited to in advance. In September/October 1621, the Pilgrims had just harvested their first crops, and they had a good yield. They “sent four men on fowling,” which comes from the one paragraph account by Pilgrim Edward Winslow, one of only two historical sources of this famous harvest feast. Winslow also stated, “we exercised our arms.” “Most historians believe what happened was Massasoit got word that there was a tremendous amount of gun fire coming from the Pilgrim village,” Turner said. “So he thought they were being attacked and he was going to bear aid.”

When the Wampanoag showed up, they were invited to join the Pilgrims in their feast, but there was not enough food to feed the chief and his 90 warriors. “He [Massasoit] sends his men out, and they bring back five deer, which they present to the chief of the English town [William Bradford]. So, there is this whole ceremonial gift-giving, as well. When you give it as a gift, it is more than just food,” said Kathleen Wall, a Colonial Foodways Culinarian at Plimoth Plantation.

The harvest feast lasted for three days. What did they eat? Venison, of course, and Wall said, “Not just a lovely roasted joint of venison, but all the parts of the deer were on the table in who knows how many sorts of ways.” Was there turkey? “Fowl” is mentioned in Winslow’s account, which puts turkey on Wall’s list of possibilities. She also said there probably would have been a variety of seafood and water fowl along with maize bread, pumpkin and other squashes. “It was nothing at all like a modern Thanksgiving,” she said.

While today Thanksgiving is one of our nation’s favorite holidays, it has a far different meaning for many Wampanoag, who now number between 4,000 and 5,000. Turner said, “For the most part, Thanksgiving itself is a day of mourning for Native people, not just Wampanoag people.”"

Read more at:  The Wampanoag Side of the First Thanksgiving Story

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